Giving Back

We are blessed to be living today in a part of the world that prospers, notwithstanding all the issues and misfortune around us. We are also fortunate to have resources, small or large, we can share with others including Third World children and their mothers, particularly for education.

As marketing communications and the companies it serves have become more globalized, this has resulted in unintended distress and consequences for others in less fortunate situations. The not-for-profits that attempt to address these issues can, fortunately, be monitored and held accountable, and the following are situations where one or more of us know the original founding persons in control, and we have confidence in them to use funding wisely. As a firm, we give back a substantial portion of our profit to such not-for-profits.

Lo Mustang Foundation                                    (Great Compassion Boarding School):

A not-for-profit boarding school focused on educating girls and preserving Tibetan culture in Upper Mustang, Nepal.  Until 1962, access to Mustang was strictly forbidden, and in literature Mustang is referred to as the “Forbidden Kingdom.” Lama Ngawang Kunga Bista, a Buddhist monk, founded the Great Compassion Boarding School (GCBS) in 2000 in Lo Monthang, and serves as its principal. For more information, see www.lomustangfoundation.org.np.

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Video Volunteers:

A not-for-profit providing local TV casting and a voice for the disenfranchised in India.

Morgan Anderson supports Video Volunteers, a US not-for-profit founded several years ago by Jessica Mayberry, a recent college graduate. Its mission is to give a media voice to the most disenfranchised in undeveloped countries using the technology of digital video media and plain hard work. VV is flourishing in India where it trains video teams in local slums and villages to produce and show programs on important local issues, give a voice, motivate involvement, and accelerate information and change. In a very short period of time, VV has become one of the largest media production companies in India. Its members are mostly untouchables, women, and children, many who cannot read or write. Click for photos/videos and further information atwww.videovolunteers.org.

supporting a positive role for marketing/communications on global social issues

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Act Responsible:

A not-for-profit supporting a positive role for marketing communications on global social issues.

Morgan Anderson supports ACT Responsible — Advertising Community Together, a Paris-based non-profit initiative whose aim is to create a positive role for marketing communications on global social issues. We all know advertising often has an unpleasant reputation and, in the view of some, bears responsibility for certain social ills. We also know that there are many fine, innovative people in the business. Founded in 2001, ACT’s goal is to federate, promote and inspire good practices from advertisers and agencies in favor of social responsibility and sustainable development. Click to see videos of social responsibility advertisements and further information at www.act-responsible.org.

providing environments that inspire commercial writers and artists to go above and beyond

Sri Aurobindo Yoga Mandir:

A not-for-profit boarding school providing education and extended family for orphans and destitutes, together with a sustainable organic farm and dairy herd, spiritual retreat center and guest house in Kathmandu and Terai, Nepal.

Founded by Ramachandra in 1993 to follow the spiritual vision of Sri Aurobindo, a friend and follower of M. Gandhi.  There are presently 150 students, and it provides a boarding school environment that is self-sustaining for education and growth so they become good citizens.  It supports itself from its own income-generating activities and from well wishers.  Go to www.auronepal.net to learn more and see pictures.  It is affiliated with Matagiri, a spirtual retreat in the Castskills near Woodstock, NY and part of the international community Auroville, India.  See www.matagiri.org.


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